Russian bodybuilder Alexander Nevsky, finding few willing to cast him as an actor, directs ‘Black Rose,’ a buddy-cop vehicle for himself. read more Source: HoolywoodReporter Movie Reviews

“When hate divides, hope remains.” Samuel Goldwyn Films has revealed the first trailer for the film titled Gook, which is a derogatory slang word in America used to describe Asians. The film is directed by Korean American filmmaker/actor Justin Chon, and is about two Korean American kids living in Los Angeles in the early 1990s. It’s set against the backdrop of the infamous L.A. Riots during 1992. Starring Justin Chon and David So, as well as Simone Baker, Curtiss Cook Jr., Sang Chon, Omono Okojie, Ben Munoz, Cesar Garcia, Isaiah Jarel, and Kirlew Vilbon. This first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year, where it won the Audience Award in the low budget Next section. This is a very cool first trailer, I dig. Here’s the first official trailer (+ poster) for Justin Chon’s Gook, in high def on Apple: Eli (Chon) and Daniel (So) are two Korean American brothers that run their late father’s shoe store in a predominantly African …

“If you knew someone was going to die, would you try and save them?” Chiller Films has debuted the official trailer for a horror film titled Camera Obscura, arriving in theaters this June. The film is about a veteran war photographer who returns from Afghanistan with PTSD. His girlfriend gives him an old camera, which he starts shooting with, only to discover (when he develops the film) that it takes photos of imminent deaths. It’s kind of like Final Destination, but with a camera. Christopher Denham stars, with Nadja Bobyleva, Catherine Curtin, Chase Williamson, and Noah Segan. The title, Camera Obscura, is a reference to pinhole photography, a real technique that doesn’t seem to be used in this. But it’s only a title. Here’s the first official trailer for Aaron B. Koontz’s Camera Obscura, originally from Collider: Please enable Javascript to watch this video A veteran war photographer (Christopher Denham) with PTSD sees imminent deaths in his developed photos, questioning his already fragile …

Salutations, all. I bring you the next episode of Indie Beat! Our guest for this current installment is filmmaker and actor Joanna Arnow. Her first released work “Eiko & Koma: The Retrospective Project” (watch here) follows the work of the titular dancers, sort of a small slice primer for those unfamiliar with the Japanese-born artists. In 2013 Joanna turned the camera on her then-boyfriend (and herself) with “i hate myself 🙂” which our own Katie Walsh reviewed for its Rooftop Films premiere, saying “It’s refreshing to see a filmmaker embrace this honesty with such gusto.” And she’s right! Continue reading Podcast: Indie Beat Talks With ‘i hate myself :)’ Director Joanna Arnow at The Playlist.

In less than six months, the term ‘fake news’ has become so all-encompassing, so utterly prevalent, that everyone’s pretty much sick of it (sorry for putting it in the headlines, guys). But as bored as we are of articles about some asshole living in his mom’s basement who gets 50,000 likes on Facebook a day for stories about how Hillary Clinton ate a baby, it doesn’t change that the volume of clickable bullshit that plays to prejudices on both sides. Continue reading Fake News: Robert De Niro Comedy ‘Wag The Dog’ Becoming An HBO Comedy Series at The Playlist.

Small town life is poignantly examined in the modest Tribeca drama “Abundant Acreage Available.” A humanist drama about family, faith, and grief, ‘Acreage’ is an intimate film with few outsized dramatic moments, but as anchored by Amy Ryan’s mannered yet commanding performance—her finest in years—this lovely little story sensitively absorbs. ‘Acreage’ begins with a makeshift funeral, a bereaved Tracy (Ryan), who’s taken care of her ailing father for years, attempts to bury the box of his ashes in the fields of her farm. Continue reading Amy Ryan Amplifies The Quiet ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.