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Tribeca Film Festival

TRIBECA: A traditional romcom from the outside that takes some emotionally honest turns for the better, Tribeca dramedy, “The Boy Downstairs” sports a trivial veneer that eventually reveal poignant insides from a refreshing female perspective. But it’s certainly not without its flaws. Built on credulity-straining contrivances this machination mars a familiar, but engaging story about boy meets girl heartbreak. However, the strong performance by Zosia Mamet (“Girls”) generally carries the film through its patchy moments. Continue reading Zosia Mamet Carries The Relationship Dramedy ‘The Boy Downstairs’ [Review] at The Playlist.

In director Elvira Lind’s absorbing documentary about American dancer Bobbi Jene Smith, the narrative triumph within is the subject’s own personal journey to independence. While artistry and those who create lie at the heart of the film and the moments where the camera bares witness to beautifully choreographed creations, it is the tale of Bobbi herself and her brave transition from student to teacher that is the most profound. Continue reading Tribeca Best Documentary Winner ‘Bobbi Jene’ Is A Joy To Watch [Review] at The Playlist.

Julian Schnabel has always worked on a grand scale, from the massive paintings he first made his name with, to his visceral depictions of entire lives as a film director, even extending to the creation of his own public image. Now, in the documentary “Julian Schnabel: A Private Portrait,” director Pappi Corsicato allows viewers an intimate glimpse into the working life of the famed artist. While Corsicato treats his subject extremely gently – there’s barely a hint of criticism of Schnabel and interviewees tout how controversial his work is without explaining why – his almost idyllic portrayal of Schnabel at work and play nevertheless makes for a largely seductive and engaging experience.  Continue reading An Idyllic Look At Artistic Life In ‘Julian Schnabel: A Private Portrait’ [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.

For Flint” For the general American public, the Flint, Michigan water crisis is over. The problem was identified, the public was outraged, the media coverage faded. But for those residents of Flint — a former industrial hub an hour north of Detroit — the catastrophe is far from finished: lawsuits are still ongoing, funds are being allocated, water lines are being replaced, and the drinking water for thousands of people is still poisonous. Continue reading Tribeca Shorts: ‘Tokyo Project’ With Elisabeth Moss, ‘For Flint,’ & ‘Approaching A Breakthrough’ at The Playlist.

For Flint” For the general American public, the Flint, Michigan water crisis is over. The problem was identified, the public was outraged, the media coverage faded. But for those residents of Flint — a former industrial hub an hour north of Detroit — the catastrophe is far from finished: lawsuits are still ongoing, funds are being allocated, water lines are being replaced, and the drinking water for thousands of people is still poisonous. Continue reading Tribeca Shorts: ‘Tokyo Project’ With Elisabeth Moss, ‘For Flint,’ & ‘Approaching A Breakthrough’ at The Playlist.

In her writing about the Nazis, Hannah Arendt famously introduced the phrase “the banality of evil” into the public lexicon. Republican political strategist Roger Stone is as evil as they come, but there is nothing even remotely banal about this man. With his slicked-back hair plugs, pinstriped suits and circular black sunglasses, he cuts a figure something like a live-action version of a cartoon super villain. He harbors a fetishistic devotion to his weasel idol Richard Nixon (Stone’s staggering collection of memorabilia includes two rare bongs in the shape of Tricky Dick’s head), and gladly shows off his back tattoo of the former President’s face to anyone who asks. Continue reading ‘Get Me Roger Stone’: The Malevolent ‘Forrest Gump’ Of Conservative Politics [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.

TRIBECA: The 25th anniversary screening of Quentin Tarantino’s debut film “Reservoir Dogs” last night and it went off like a rock concert, the movie’s star Quentin Tarantino greeted by the raucous crowd like a bonafide rockstar. The filmmaker made a grand entrance to much audience eruption of hooting and hollering; Tarantino waltzing in from backstage through the front of the crowd, sauntering in and sitting down in the middle of the audience in the dead-center middle seats. Continue reading Quentin Tarantino & ‘Reservoir Dogs’ At Tribeca: 8 Things We Learned at The Playlist.

The Tribeca Film Festival’s selection of “Nobody’s Watching” for its International Dramatic Competition is certainly a canny move, as the film couldn’t find a better home than this New York fest. Despite its transnational reach, Julia Solomonoff’s latest film—her first since “The Last Summer of La Boyita” in 2009—conveys the universal experience of actors struggling to make ends meet in the Big Apple. Continue reading ‘Nobody’s Watching’ Deserves Its Best Acting Award At Tribeca [Review] at The Playlist.

A coming of age documentary told against the fiery backdrop of teenager Mike Brown’s tragic death and the Ferguson, Missouri riots and protests that followed in 2014, the documentary “For Ahkeem” is a sobering piece of work. One of the most startling and lingering sequences begins when the film’s subject Daje Shelton and her mother sit shellshocked watching television as protests erupt in Ferguson following the grand jury ruling on the police officers that killed an unarmed teenage boy. Continue reading ‘For Ahkeem’: One Sobering Story Of Hardship Reflects Many [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.

Gilbert Gottfried might not be a human being. He might actually be a cat in a human being costume. About forty minutes into “Gilbert,” Neil Berkeley’s incongruously warm and fuzzy doc about the comic legend’s life and times, Gilbert packs a couple suitcases for a cross-country tour. He readies to leave the apartment he and his wife, Dara Gottfried, live in, and as he makes for the door she makes a request. Continue reading ‘Gilbert’ Gottfried Doc Does Justice To A Comedy Legend [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.