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Tribeca Film Festival

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The Tribeca Film Festival is still in full swing (it’s long!) and one film that’s worth keeping an eye on is the documentary “The Sensitives,” which screens tonight. Directed by cinematographer-turned-helmer Drew Xanthopoulos, it might remind you of a real-life version of Todd Haynes’ “Safe,” in that it focuses on a group of people who have become near-allergic to the outside world, and the woman who tries to help them. Continue reading Tribeca Exclusive: Clip & Poster For The ‘Safe’-Like Documentary ‘The Sensitives’ at The Playlist.
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Given the artificiality of celebrity and Hollywood, the idea of a manufactured laugh track and canned applause is a pretty clever metaphor for the emptiness of fame. But a loose concept is not a movie if it’s not carefully drawn, pondered and conceived. And the promise of such a potentially nifty little idea isn’t so much squandered in the hapless Tribeca indie “The Clapper” as barely explored. Continue reading The Insipid ‘The Clapper,’ About Fame & Halfwits, Is Hopeless [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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In “Blame,” the startlingly confident debut film by precocious 22 year-old triple threat writer/director/star Quinn Shephard, the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival receives its true breakout of the year, while also serving as a brutal reminder as to why you couldn’t pay me to be a teenager again. Abigail (Shephard) is returning to school after a year away following a very public breakdown. An easy target for bullies, especially mean girl Melissa (Nadia Alexander) Abigail finds reprieve after she’s cast in the leading role in the school production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible,” a feeling compounded on when she catches the attention of her teacher empathetic Jeremy (Chris Messina). Continue reading ‘Blame’: 22-Year-Old Filmmaker Quinn Shephard Becomes One To Watch With Her Startling Debut [Tribeca] at The Playlist.
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When was the last time you thought to yourself, “gee, I can’t wait for a Spike TV documentary?” It’s not that Spike isn’t good at… erm, what they do for their audience—cable channel programming for male adults—but let’s face it, their reality TV and sports programming (shows by Adam Carolla, Dave Navarro’s tattoo show and “Lip Sync Battle”), doesn’t actually scream captivating documentaries that make their debut at reasonably prestigious festivals like the Tribeca Film Festival. Continue reading The Stirring ‘I Am Heath Ledger’ Frames The World Through The Lens Of An Artist [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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Flames” co-directors Josephine Decker and Zefrey Throwell have created something truly unique with their new docudrama, a word and genre that typically should be weighed heavily before being written as a descriptor. For good or for ill, depending on how gratuitously self-indulgent you find their filmed voyage of their passionate first months of uninterrupted love and inevitable disintegration, “Flames” is without a doubt unlike any other film released in recent memory. Continue reading Josephine Decker’s ‘Flames’ Captures The Burning Lights & Charred Embers Of Love [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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To keep it indie 100 for a minute, and hopefully not sound too obscure, if indie filmmaker Alex Ross Perry was to Roman Polanski what his paranoiac feature “Queen Of Earth” was to Polanski’s “The Tenant,” then director Nathan Silver is to Rainer Werner Fassbinder what “Thirst Street” is to the German New Wave director’s “Lola. Continue reading Lindsay Burdge Sparkles In The Delicious Psycho Sexual Thriller ‘Thirst Street’ [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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In the first 15 minutes of the documentary “A River Below,” director Mark Grieco introduces two unforgettable characters, and one mystery. First up is Fernando Trujillo, a conservationist who’s spent years leading a team that tracks the population of Amazon river dolphins—a.k.a. “pink dolphins” or “botos”—in order to warn Brazilians that careless native fisherman are endangering one of their country’s most beloved native animals. Trujillo is one of many conscientious scientists who work behind the scenes to collect data, file reports, and safeguard the world’s natural resources. Continue reading Engrossing Doc ‘A River Below’ Dives In Search Of Dying Amazon River Dolphins [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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Not long into Erik Nelson’s tightly-packed and disturbing documentary “A Gray State,” discussing a December 2015 murder-suicide in a Minneapolis suburb that left filmmaker David Crowley, his wife Komel, and their five-year-old daughter Raniya dead, local journalist Cory Zurowski noted that it was “catnip for conspiracy theorists.” Why? Because for several years, Crowley had been trying to make a feature film called “Gray State” that looked like something cooked up by a roomful of Alex Jones fans after a three-day Red Bull and Googling marathon. Continue reading When Fantasies Kill: The Murderous Madness Of An Alt-Right Paranoiac In ‘A Gray State’ [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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There’s a reason that Ronald Reagan is still called “The Great Communicator” all these years later, and it’s all on screen in Sierra Pettengill and Pacho Velez’s documentary “The Reagan Show,” making its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival. Eschewing both the cozily intimate style of modern political portraits like “Mitt” or the hard-hitting reportorial data crunch of a “Frontline” episode, Pettengill and Velez instead mine the thousands of hours of footage from the time period. Continue reading ‘The Reagan Show’ Is A Comedic But Sober Documentary About Politics As Blooper Reel [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist.
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Filmmaker Angus MacLachlan has a good history with the Tribeca Film Festival. Back in 2014, MacLachlan’s debut film — the divorce dramedy “Goodbye to All That” — was a hit with the Tribeca jury members and crowds alike, garnering a Best Narrative Feature nomination as well as a Best Actor win for star Paul Schneider. Now, three years later, MacLachlan is back at the festival with “Abundant Acreage Available,” his film about a pair of rural siblings dealing with the loss of their father. Continue reading Amy Ryan Doesn’t Care What You Think In This Exclusive Clip From ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ at The Playlist.
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