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Festivals

It had been hot and bright all the days prior, with the sun blazing down from the clear blue skies over Cluj, during my visit to the Transilvania Film Festival in Romania. But the day of my interview with Francis Lee, director of the heartswellingly lovely “God’s Own Country,” which opened the Edinburgh Film Festival this week, dawned gray and rainy and stayed that way. Continue reading ‘God’s Own Country’ Director Francis Lee On ‘Pretty Woman,’ Brexit And This ‘Super Exciting’ Era Of Queer Cinema at The Playlist.

Did you know there is a new movie premiering at the 2017 Los Angeles Film Festival that feature the onscreen reunion of “Westworld” stars Ed Harris and Clifton Collins, Jr.?  Hollywood is always full of surprises, isn’t it? Trevor White’s “A Crooked Somebody” centers on Michael (“Mad Men’s” Rich Sommer), a psychic con artist who becomes entangled with a career criminal (Collins, Jr.) who is haunted by one of his murder victims 20 years before.   Continue reading ‘A Crooked Somebody’: Exclusive Stills With ‘Westworld’s’ Clifton Collins, Jr. And ‘Silicon Valley’s’ Amanda Crew at The Playlist.

Jeremy Renner will join Casey Affleck as a recipient of the KVIFF Festival President’s Award at the 52nd KarloyVary International Film Festival.  The Oscar nominee best known for his roles in “The Hurt Locker,” “The Avengers” and the last two “Mission: Impossible” films will accept the honor at the festival’s closing ceremony on July 8. Renner will also present his latest film, “Wind River,” during the course of the nine-day festival. Continue reading Jeremy Renner and Uma Thurman Join Casey Affleck As 2017 KarlovyVary Film Festival Honorees at The Playlist.

You don’t have to have had his face as your avatar since you joined Twitter, like a certain @jessicakiang we could mention, to believe that Cary Grant is possibly the greatest movie star that cinema has ever produced. But nor does choosing to have Roger O. Thornhill from “North By Northwest” grimace out from your every tweet mean that you’re unaware of the actor’s rumored checkered personal history or that you uncomplicatedly embrace his mythos. Continue reading Showtime’s ‘Becoming Cary Grant’ Is A Disappointingly Depthless Doc [Review] at The Playlist.

Innocence doesn’t just end, it is dashed on the jagged rocks of experience at the end of a torpid Icelandic summer in Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson‘s beautifully observed, though overlong coming-of-age tale. Less a structured story than a series of fleeting impressions, it is told not through dialogue or exposition, but through ephemeral, sensuous details — long hair whipped by gusts of wind, sunlight trapped in the peach fuzz of a cheek, droplets of sweat beading the nape of a neck, fingers beginning to prune in spring water. Continue reading Icelandic Debut ‘Heartstone’ Is A Beautiful, Heartsore Account Of Childhood’s End [Transilvania Fest Review] at The Playlist.

Innocence doesn’t just end, it is dashed on the jagged rocks of experience at the end of a torpid Icelandic summer in Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson‘s beautifully observed, though overlong coming-of-age tale. Less a structured story than a series of fleeting impressions, it is told not through dialogue or exposition, but through ephemeral, sensuous details — long hair whipped by gusts of wind, sunlight trapped in the peach fuzz of a cheek, droplets of sweat beading the nape of a neck, fingers beginning to prune in spring water. Continue reading Icelandic Debut ‘Heartstone’ Is A Beautiful, Heartsore Account Of Childhood’s End [Transilvania Fest Review] at The Playlist.

Innocence doesn’t just end, it is dashed on the jagged rocks of experience at the end of a torpid Icelandic summer in Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson‘s beautifully observed, though overlong coming-of-age tale. Less a structured story than a series of fleeting impressions, it is told not through dialogue or exposition, but through ephemeral, sensuous details — long hair whipped by gusts of wind, sunlight trapped in the peach fuzz of a cheek, droplets of sweat beading the nape of a neck, fingers beginning to prune in spring water. Continue reading Icelandic Debut ‘Heartstone’ Is A Beautiful, Heartsore Account Of Childhood’s End [Transilvania Fest Review] at The Playlist.

Innocence doesn’t just end, it is dashed on the jagged rocks of experience at the end of a torpid Icelandic summer in Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson‘s beautifully observed, though overlong coming-of-age tale. Less a structured story than a series of fleeting impressions, it is told not through dialogue or exposition, but through ephemeral, sensuous details — long hair whipped by gusts of wind, sunlight trapped in the peach fuzz of a cheek, droplets of sweat beading the nape of a neck, fingers beginning to prune in spring water. Continue reading Icelandic Debut ‘Heartstone’ Is A Beautiful, Heartsore Account Of Childhood’s End [Transilvania Fest Review] at The Playlist.

Innocence doesn’t just end, it is dashed on the jagged rocks of experience at the end of a torpid Icelandic summer in Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson‘s beautifully observed, though overlong coming-of-age tale. Less a structured story than a series of fleeting impressions, it is told not through dialogue or exposition, but through ephemeral, sensuous details — long hair whipped by gusts of wind, sunlight trapped in the peach fuzz of a cheek, droplets of sweat beading the nape of a neck, fingers beginning to prune in spring water. Continue reading Icelandic Debut ‘Heartstone’ Is A Beautiful, Heartsore Account Of Childhood’s End [Transilvania Fest Review] at The Playlist.

Innocence doesn’t just end, it is dashed on the jagged rocks of experience at the end of a torpid Icelandic summer in Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson‘s beautifully observed, though overlong coming-of-age tale. Less a structured story than a series of fleeting impressions, it is told not through dialogue or exposition, but through ephemeral, sensuous details — long hair whipped by gusts of wind, sunlight trapped in the peach fuzz of a cheek, droplets of sweat beading the nape of a neck, fingers beginning to prune in spring water. Continue reading Icelandic Debut ‘Heartstone’ Is A Beautiful, Heartsore Account Of Childhood’s End [Transilvania Fest Review] at The Playlist.