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Thank goodness for Letterboxd. I was originally going to title this article “Hitting My Mark”, but I’d rather go with the catchphrase “Always Be Watching” – meaning, simply, always be watching films. New films, old films, big films, small films, just keep watching. It’s my mantra and has been for years, since the early days of running this website. If I don’t want to watch a film that was just released, there’s always (always!) more old films to watch. And there’s always something that I haven’t yet seen to watch. As someone whose job it is to watch movies, my goal is to fit in a movie every day. It’s not always possible, but I try. This year I decided to keep track of all the films I’ve seen using the wonderful Letterboxd, so I can actually keep count and look back at it all. It’s the end of July and I’m already over 200 films. Do I get a …

“It comes with a mystery attached.” Infamous Danish filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn has launched a brand new cinema website, open to the public today, called byNWR.com. The new website is essentially a specialized streaming service, available entirely for free, where Refn handpicks and highlights “meticulously restored” films. This has been his own personal hobby already that he has decided to let the public in on. And he insists there’s no catch, or gimmick, or anything else, he just wants to offer up these films and enrich the world of cinema (and the internet) with these rare, long-lost gems. There is a new release every quarter, divided into three monthly chapters. For the first volume, Refn invited acclaimed biographer and journalist Jimmy McDonough to be the initial guest editor for “Regional Renegades” – all three films available now. So what is this all about? Refn explained the basic concept to The Guardian earlier this month. “Over recent years, I’ve bought and …

“I was trying to create a character that I myself would identify with.” A film from Belarus titled Crystal Swan premiered at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival this year, the feature directorial debut of a talented filmmaker named Darya Zhuk. Darya grew up in Minsk, Belarus, but left at age 16 to study in the US. After graduating college and years of working in various jobs, she eventually went to study directing at Columbia University and has finally completed her first feature film – Crystal Swan, about a young Belarusian woman named Velya who is trying to get a visa to go visit the USA. The film premiered to positive reviews and is still searching for an American distributor, but I wanted to bring extra attention to this filmmaker and her film. Here is my interview with Darya Zhuk, discussing the challenges and joys of making her first feature. Zhuk’s Crystal Swan is about a woman named Evelina, or Velya for …

“This is telemarketing. Stick to the script.” One of the year’s wildest, weirdest, most original films is Sorry to Bother You, from the mind of Boots Riley (watch the trailer here). This is Boots first feature film, but he has some experience making music videos and in the theater world previously. Boots is also a very successful musician, not only as a rapper and songwriter but also as a producer. His film is about a kid from Oakland, played by Lakeith Stanfield, who takes a crap telemarketing job to make some money. Using his “white voice”, he works up the sales chain until finally meeting the CEO and being introduced to the glorious world of high society and rich snobs. It’s already on its way to becoming a huge indie hit. With the film now playing in theaters, I had a chance to chat with Boots for an interview and couldn’t pass up the opportunity. I first watched Boots’ film Sorry …

“I’ve been expecting you, Mr. Bond…” There’s a brand new, one-of-a-kind cinematic installation now open on the top of a mountain in Austria and it’s amazing. Open to the public today (July 12th) in Sölden, Austria is 007 Elements, a new James Bond museum/experience that is a spectacular, sleek, thrilling permanent adventure into the world of 007 and its 56-year history. This installation has been under construction for two years, and it’s finally open. I was lucky enough to visit Sölden earlier this week and get a sneak preview inside of 007 Elements, joining a group of the most die-hard 007 fans from other Bond websites/fan clubs all over the world. We were all very seriously impressed. Sölden’s 007 Elements installation is even better than I expected, entirely worth the trek into the mountains and up to the top of Gaislachkogl to experience. I first heard about the “007 Elements” installation over a year ago, when it was first announced from …

“Not man. Not machine. More.” One of the biggest surprises of the year is an action sci-fi titled Upgrade, the second feature film directed by Australian filmmaker/writer Leigh Whannell. Whannell has worked in Hollywood for over a decade. He broke in with a little indie called Saw, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2004 and went on to become, well, a succesful franchise and a massive hit. Whannell wrote the script for it with James Wan, and starred in it, then continued his career mostly as a screenwriter & producer. The first film he directed was Insidious: Chapter 3 in 2015, jumping in the hot seat with another horror franchise he co-created with James Wan. Upgrade is Whannell’s first time going all out, directing an original screenplay he wrote, working with Blumhouse and mega-producer Jason Blum to get the film made. I’ve been following Whannell closely since the early days of the Saw movies, and I was lucky to …

It all began in 2015. After seeing Star Wars: The Force Awakens, we started messaging each other furiously. For nearly two weeks there was non-stop chatter – on theories, ideas, things to look for, things we noticed, fleeting thoughts, any- and everything related to the movie. Two years went by, and after many many more text message debates like this, Mike and I decided to launch a podcast so we could just talk directly about everything. So in December of 2017, with the release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, we launched The First Word Podcast – in-depth discussion, analysis, and interviews about the latest movies, and some old ones, too. We just released our 10th episode this week, so it’s time for a recap of all the episodes so far. You know, in case you might’ve missed one. Or maybe you’ve never listened? There’s no better time to start than now. To celebrate the occasion and for this look back …

Need to add some books to your summer reading list? Looking for some good reading recommendations you haven’t already heard about? Start here. You’ll find plenty of great inspiration. Fellow cinephile and friend of the site H Nelson Tracey, who also writes for the site Cinemacy, has created another new video essay breaking down and examining all of the books shown and objects and films referenced in a film. This time he profiles David Fincher’s Zodiac, praised by many critics as Fincher’s best film. This extensive featurette examines and features each & every book and magazine shown in Zodiac, you’ll find plenty that catches your eye when you watch. Nelson also made one of these videos for Matt Ross’ Captain Fantastic last year, and this one is another fascinating literary breakdown following his excellent work last year. Watch in full below. Thanks to Nelson for tipping me off that this video was ready. For more info and a full list of …

What are the best films out of this year’s Cannes Film Festival? Which ones should you be taking an interest in? What films should be a priority for you to see? After 12 days at the 71st Cannes Film Festival, after 33 screenings, it’s time to present my 2018 list of my Top 8 Favorite Films. This was my 9th time back to this festival, and I love being there in the middle of all, committing fully to seeing as many films as I can. These eight listed below are the ones that I adore, that connected with me emotionally or intellectually, and I hope everyone plans to check them out when they arrive in their neighborhood. They are worth the wait. There were many outstanding films this year, and this is my final recap of the 2018 festival – see all of these. I was lucky to catch a total of 33 films at Cannes this year (my full list …

“I’m not interested in making a film for a niche audience. I want to make films about people who we don’t usually see, but for a wider audience so they can all relate to it.” One of the best films I saw at a festival last year was The Rider, a film by Chloe Zhao, set in the heartland of America about a broken cowboy trying to maintain his identity. The film left me an emotional mess, in the best kind of way, and I wrote a glowing review after catching it at the London Film Festival. The person who made this is a Beijing-born filmmaker named Chloé Zhao, and she has many stories to tell – not only her own, about everyone she encounters. I was lucky to meet with her for an interview and to talk about The Rider, and the art of minimal filmmaking. The Rider (watch the trailer) is a fascinating film because it features real people …