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Cannes

What constitutes a family? It’s a theme, like an instinctual migratory destination, that the compassionate Japanese helmer Hirokazu Kore-eda (“Like Father, Like Son“) returns to time and time again. Following the mixed response from h…

That’s a wrap on Cannes. The closing night ceremony of the 71st Cannes Film Festival took place this afternoon with President Cate Blanchett presiding over her group of jurors including Lea Seydoux, Kristen Stewart, Ava DuVernay, Denis Villeneuve and m…

It’s been a long time since making traditional or even vaguely conventional “movies” has interested legendary French New-Wave filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard. If anything, the director’s movies over the last 20 or so years have been e…

When a director decides to venture into a well-worn genre, comparisons to far superior films are inevitable. And so, a film like Joe Penna‘s feature-length directorial debut, “Arctic,” a survival drama, will no doubt run the risk of b…

Italian filmmaker Alice Rohrwacher was awarded the Grand Jury Prize back in 2014 for her sophomore effort, “The Wonders,” a drama filled with magical but natural surrealism starring Monica Bellucci and Alba Rohwacher, the director’s s…

It’s remarkable and perplexing that a landmark work such as director Bi Gan‘s latest film, “Long Day’s Journey into Night,” is not part of this year’s official competition at the Cannes Film Festival. The mezmerizing…

Another day, another Lars Von Trier movie premiering at the Cannes Film Festival to outrage and soon to be infamy. A Lars Von Trier movie about a serial killer who mutilates women? What could possibly go wrong? The ledes are endless and the controversy…

“Shéhérazade,” which premiered recently as part of Critics’ Week at Cannes, is far from your typical love story. The feature film debut from director Jean-Bernard Marlin tells the story of a 17-year-old boy, who is just released from prison and becomes…

If there’s one defining quality of the cinema of Gaspar Noé, aside from shots of ejaculating penises in 3D, it’s definitely impatience. His new film, “Climax” even begins impatiently, interrupting its Arte logo with a staticky v…

It was just four years ago that Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski stunned the cinematic world with his post-holocaust 80-minute film, “Ida” which somehow wasn’t in Cannes competition in 2014. Beautifully rendered in a cold, affecting black and wh…