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Oliver Lyttelton

Oliver Lyttelton

Another year, another BFI London Film Festival — fifteen years since the first one I attended as a sixteen-year-old, and my ninth year of covering as press for The Playlist. And I think I may have finally cracked it. It can be hard to cover a film fest…

It’s been an incredibly exciting half-decade or so in terms of the emergence of new horror directors. It seems barely a month or two goes by without some immensely talented filmmaker emerging from the genre and making a name for themselves. Some, like …

It’s rare to be truly surprised by a movie. Even at a film festival (especially one like the LFF, which mostly screens movies that have picked up buzz elsewhere), you’re often playing catch-up, and even when you find something that no one else ha…

Back in 2009, one of the most notable names to appear on the world film scene was Samuel Maoz. The then-47-year-old filmmaker, a former documentarian, made his feature debut with “Lebanon,” a gripping war drama set entirely within a tank during the 198…

Nearly three-quarters of the way through the year, and most of the big hitters from last January’s Sundance have already hit theaters, with only a couple of the more awards-y contenders still to unspool, like “Call Me By Your Name,” “Mudbound” and “Nov…

Money, goes the saying, can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you pretty much everything else, including an infinite sense of privilege, and an evasion of the justice system. A billionaire can hoodwink millions of people into thinking he’s out to ser…

For the past few decades, gritty arthouse British movies have invariably been an urban affair: from Mike Leigh to “Nil By Mouth” and “Trainspotting” to “Kidulthood” and “Red Road,” almost every element of contemporary city life in the U.K. has been map…

While it sometimes feels that you can’t move from WWII movies (this summer’s megahit “Dunkirk” first and foremost among them recently), its predecessor is more neglected in cinema on the whole. A number of great films have been made about WWI (or…

The line between comedy and horror has always been a thin one, and few in the last twenty years have proven that better than British comedy group The League Of Gentlemen. Their macabre and often terrifying characters made them a cult sensation in the UK, and while they never broke out beyond comedy experts in the U.S, you’ve likely seen some of their work since: Mark Gatiss, one of the quartet, went on to co-create “Sherlock,” while Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith are behind the terrific, similarly-toned series “Inside No. Continue reading Martin Freeman & Andy Nyman Tell Terrifying ‘Ghost Stories’ [BFI London Film Fest Review] at The Playlist.

Early word on 2014’s “Paddington” was tentative at best. The live-action/CGI revival of the iconic British children’s character, created by Michael Bond (who passed away sadly this year) gave off a slight early whiff of “Garfield” or “Marmaduke,” had a rather unpromising early trailer, and even spawned the Creepy Paddington meme in advance of its release. But when Paul King‘s film arrived, it proved to be a delight: a near-Pixar level of family entertainment with big laughs, a gigantic heart, real cinematic magic, and an utterly vital message about refugees. Continue reading Full Trailer For ‘Paddington 2’ With Ben Whishaw & Hugh Grant [Watch] at The Playlist.