Author Archive

Jordan Ruimy

Jordan Ruimy

The story of Jane Goodall is well-known. The world’s foremost expert on chimpanzees, over the course of a 55-year study of the social and familial interactions of the primates in Gombe, Goodall’s fieldwork has become groundbreaking in makin…

Following ecstatic receptions at Sundance, the Toronto International Film Festival and the New York Film Festival, Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name,” continues to garner rave reviews. With this love story between a teenage Italian boy named Elio…

There’s no doubt that Marvel head and President Kevin Feige is lover of comic books. You’d have to be in order to accomplish what he has with the Marvel Cinematic Universe since its inception in 2008. Feige’s achieved what many have tried b…

Some people are calling Joachim Trier‘s “Thelma” his first foray into the horror genre. It is not. “Thelma” is actually an indescribable mix of genres: drama, thriller, family, horror, mystery, comedy and, yes, even supern…

Dee Rees’ “Mudbound” is a complex and invigorating account of post-WWII racial tensions in 1940s Mississippi. The film addresses, with astute sensitivity, the timeless racial struggles still at play in America. Rees, whose “Pariah&#82…

It is safe to say that many people were lukewarm towards the two “Thor” movies Marvel has released thus far. Which is a real shame, given that the character himself, a hammer-wielding God, has plenty of potential for potent cinematic entertainment. It …

At the 55th New York Film Festival, the great Argentinian filmmaker Lucrecia Martel brought her latest unique venture, “Zama.” The film is a peculiar oddity, a tackling of Spanish history with deliberate inaccuracies. It’s an adaptati…

The Square” is a movie that dares to challenge political correctness in its ferociously unhinged study of the human psyche. What exactly binds us to communicate and be civil to each other is the central question posed by writer-director Ruben Ostlund. The episodic nature of “The Square” is also an unrestrained attempt at a comedy of manners. It works brilliantly as Ostlund stages one crazed set-piece after another, upping the ante with every sequence until we arrive at a high-brow museum dinner featuring a monkey-man terrorizing its guests. Continue reading ‘The Square’: Ruben Ostlund Talks Wanting To Win At Cannes, Contemporary Art, More [Interview] at The Playlist.

The Last Detail,” Hal Ashby’s 1973 masterpiece about the road trip and toxic friendship which developed between three Navy sailors has aged like fine wine over the years, turning into an elegy for the country’s loss of innocence post-Vietnam. Jack Nicholson and Randy Quaid‘s incredible performances drove the narrative home with unexpectedly touching vitality, and the picture has cemented a place as one of the greats of 1970s American cinema. Continue reading ‘Last Flag Flying’: Richard Linklater Talks Sequels, More ‘Dazed’ & Disappointment With ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ at The Playlist.

The classic Robert Louis Stevenson story of split identities is given another cinematic treatment in Serge Bozon‘s “Mrs. Hyde,” which stars Isabelle Huppert as the titular character, although she is at first just Madame Gequil — a dissatisfied physics teacher at a blue-collar high-school mostly filled with kids from an immigrant background. At first, playing like a parody of “Dangerous Minds,” the structural and ruling management of Madame Gequil’s classes is all over the place, and whenever she appears for her afternoon tech class, chaos ensues among the students. Continue reading ‘Mrs. Hyde’: Isabelle Huppert Is Delightfully Madcap In Uneven Screwball Comedy [NYFF Review] at The Playlist.