Author Archive

Andrew Crump

Andrew Crump

It’s fitting that Paul Thomas Anderson, a filmmaker known for fastidious craftsmanship, decided to make a movie about a fastidious craftsman. It’s true that Anderson has compared his new film “Phantom Thread” to Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rebecca”; it’s…

Maybe the fall of 2017 wasn’t the right time for a 4K restoration of “La Belle Noiseuse,”  Jacques Rivette’s four hour ode to the creative process; headlines today are dominated by reports of predatory or simply lascivious men leveraging power to explo…

There’s a pliability to the title of Daniel McCabe’s documentary “This Is Congo”: It’s both a contract between the author and his audience, and an apathetic shrug of the shoulders. McCabe immediately announces his purpose in making the film, a primer o…

The sex in season two of “The Girlfriend Experience” is even less sexy than the sex in its first, if you can believe it. It’s not supposed to be sexy, of course, or titillating. It’s provocative, as graphically staged sex scenes should be, but showrunn…

It’s a rare filmmaker whose movies give the impression of nothing happening when everything is happening, and that qualifier suits Hou Hsiao-hsien just fine: He’s one of a kind, the type who gets away with checking influences in his work because his wo…

Months from now, or maybe years, we’ll probably look at Zak Hilditch’s “1922” as the most essential Stephen King adaptation produced in 2017. Competition is stiff: Andy Muschietti’s “It” and Mike Flanagan’s “Gerald’s Game,” respectively released in the…

Vivian Qu’s new film, “Angels Wear White,” couldn’t come to us at a better or worse time, depending on your point of view. In last week and a half or so, torrents of reports about the deserved fall of movie mogul and sexual abuser Harvey Weinstein have…

According to the work of contemporary genius auteur Roland Emmerich, the person responsible for leading the 1969 Stonewall riots and founding the LGBTQ movement was a clean-cut white kid from middle America, who chucked bricks and led freedom chants that would change the course of the country’s relationship to gay rights forever. Also according to Emmerich per his execrable 2015 film “Stonewall,” transgender activist Marsha P. Johnson was a human being. Continue reading ‘The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson’ Will Haunt You [Review] at The Playlist.

If you take the title of Jenna Bass’s new film, “High Fantasy,” at face value, you’ll probably picture a stoner comedy-cum-genre flick, a’la “Your Highness,” in which unlikely heroes are pitted against mythical dangers while stricken with a case of the stoned giggly-fits. To an extent, this characterization is fair: Bass does assemble of diverse troupe of characters, and she does set them on a quest of sorts, and she does incorporate a fantasy element in their travels after they all get roasted on weed, but the fundamental conflicts of “High Fantasy” are rooted in the real world, and those conflicts make the film feel all too familiar. Continue reading ‘High Fantasy’ Is An Artistic & Intimate Body Swap Drama [TIFF Review] at The Playlist.

Sometimes movies disappoint us by failing to live up to our expectations for them. Others, they disappoint us through sheer badness alone. Stephen McCallum’s “1%” disappoints us through wasted promise, threatening to take an interesting angle on biker gang film tropes before totally chickening out and playing the hits instead. If you’ve ever seen a season of “Sons of Anarchy,” you more or less know what you’re going to get out of “1%,” and if “Sons of Anarchy” is your cup of vodka and orange juice, then you’ll probably enjoy McCallum’s work on its own terms. Continue reading ‘1%’: Biker Gang Drama Tries To Breathe Life Into The Outlaw Genre [TIFF Review] at The Playlist.