Author Archive

Andrew Crump

Andrew Crump

Gauging the success of “White Tide: The Legend of Culebra” probably means gauging how the film’s subject, Ronnie Hyden, responds to it. Will he dig it? Will he hate it? Will he sense that director Theo Love has honored him, if not flattered him, with h…

Funny how intimacy can, in the right circumstances, subject to the right influences, become utterly terrifying, as if the very thought of opening up to another human being means putting yourself in harm’s way. There’s risk in vulnerability,…

The opening sequence of Michael Tully‘s “Don’t Leave Home” is the best horror movie I’ve seen in 2018 to date. The last shot is the best ending to a horror movie I’ve seen in 2018 to date. Everything sandwiched in be…

The tried and true “archival footage + talking heads” documentary formula works, and good documentarians know how to swing that formula without sacrificing filmmaking’s visual component. Pick your interviewees. Choose your locations. …

Watching the noir-ish sci-fi movie “Mute,” from English filmmaker Duncan Jones (“Source Code,” “Warcraft“), I couldn’t help wondering about the intended audience the director made the film for, and whether I&#8…

Movies imitating “Before Sunrise” have nearly grown into a genre unto themselves since 1995, but damned if more than a handful of them have succeeded in reproducing the loose, genuine, thoroughly unfussed energy of that Richard Linklater cl…

Film festivals are hyperbole’s rookery. If you need convincing, try reading festival programming notes or, better still, put your eye holes on festival reviews as journalists feverishly crank out piece after piece, screening after screening; the scramb…

We’re not short on events and bulletins worth getting pissed over in 2018, but let’s not use that as an excuse to exclude further events and bulletins from pissing us off, too. Take documentary filmmaker Stephen Maing’s latest feature, “Crime + Punishm…

“Pity,” the second feature from Greek filmmaker Babis Makridis, begins and ends with the sight and sounds of a weeping man, and in between is divided into chapters through aggressive use of intertitles. Their ubiquity recalls the rhythm of a silent fil…

It’s fitting that Paul Thomas Anderson, a filmmaker known for fastidious craftsmanship, decided to make a movie about a fastidious craftsman. It’s true that Anderson has compared his new film “Phantom Thread” to Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rebecca”; it’s…