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Adam Frazier

Adam Frazier

Over the last 12 months, I’ve seen more than 100 new releases — that’s over eight days of time in total spent watching new movies — and I’m happy to report that it’s been another incredible year at the cinema, despite claims that “film is dead.” This year, I was lucky enough to see vital new work by visionary filmmakers like Denis Villeneuve, Guillermo del Toro, Steven Spielberg, and Darren Aronofsky. I witnessed soul-stirring performances by Frances McDormand, Timothee Chalamet, Mary J. Blige, Willem Dafoe, Sally Hawkins, and Michael Stuhlbarg. And I was thoroughly entertained by emotionally engaging, visually impressive blockbusters like War for the Planet of the Apes, Wonder Woman, Star Wars: The Last Jedi and Blade Runner 2049. So which films did I enjoy the most? Which are my favorites? Let’s find out. To read all of Adam’s reviews from 2017, click here. Follow Adam on Twitter at @AdamFrazier, too. Below are my picks for the Top 10 Films of …

Written and directed by filmmaker Rian Johnson (of Brick, The Brothers Bloom, Looper), Star Wars: The Last Jedi is the second entry in the Star Wars sequel trilogy, following J.J. Abrams’ Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Upon its release in late 2015, The Force Awakens received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics and praise from fans worldwide for restoring the saga’s former glory while injecting it with fresh blood. As beloved as Episode VII was, however, one criticism continued to appear: it was too safe; a rehash of George Lucas’ 1977 film. If Abrams’ movie was too safe, then Johnson’s follow-up may prove too risky. Picking up moments after Episode VII’s cliffhanger ending with Rey finally meeting Luke, The Last Jedi begins with the evacuation of D’Qar, home to the Resistance’s secret base. After the destruction of their superweapon, Starkiller Base, the First Order attacks the planet, with General Hux (Domhnall Gleeson) leading the charge with their massive battleship, the Dreadnaught. General …

Director Zack Snyder’s Superman reboot, Man of Steel, received mostly positive reviews when it released in 2013, but ultimately underperformed at the box office. The second entry in the DC Extended Universe (DCEU), Snyder’s sequel Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, encountered an overwhelmingly negative response from critics and lukewarm audience sentiment, despite making $873 million. Similarly, the third film in the franchise, David Ayer’s Suicide Squad, wound up with terrible reviews but still surpassed expectations. Everything changed this year, when Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman received widespread critical acclaim and overwhelming audience support, becoming one of the best-reviewed superhero movies of all time and the highest-grossing superhero origin movie in history. Now, Justice League hopes to ride Wonder Woman’s coattails and deliver a fun, hopeful film that lives up to the legacy of the iconic superhero team that first assembled in Marvel Comics’ 1960’s The Brave and the Bold #28. Directed by Snyder with a screenplay by Chris Terrio (Batman …

First published in 1934, Agatha Christie’s novel, Murder on the Orient Express, is considered one of the most suspenseful and thrilling mysteries ever written. The book, which concerns the murder of a wealthy businessman aboard a luxury train, features one of Christie’s most famous & long-lived characters, detective Hercule Poirot. The Belgian sleuth with a magnificent mustache has appeared in more than 30 novels and 50 short stories and has been portrayed on radio, in film, and on TV by various actors, including Albert Finney, Sir Peter Ustinov, Tony Randall, Alfred Molina, Orson Welles, and David Suchet. Now, 83 years after its debut, Murder on the Orient Express receives another lavish, star-studded film adaptation, this time by actor-turned-director Kenneth Branagh (Henry V, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein), who also stars. If you haven’t read Christie’s novel or seen one of its many previous adaptations, Orient Express begins in 1930s Istanbul with Poirot (Branagh) meeting up with his old friend, Monsieur Bouc (Tom Bateman), …

Created by Stan Lee & Jack Kirby, Thor first appeared in 1962’s comic Journey Into Mystery #83, a sci-fi anthology published by Marvel Comics. Based on the Norse deity of the same name, Thor is the God of Thunder and possesses Mjolnir, an enchanted hammer. A year later, Thor was included in The Avengers #1 as a founding member of the team, and the character has since appeared in every subsequent volume of the series. As a result, Thor has become one of Marvel’s most popular and enduring superheroes, featured in countless comics, animated series, video games, and live-action films. Played by Chris Hemsworth, Thor has appeared in five Marvel Cinematic Universe movies – including Thor, The Avengers, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, and a cameo at the end of Doctor Strange. His latest cinematic outing, Thor: Ragnarok, looks to set a new standard for not just the Thor series, but the rest of the MCU as …

Based on the Philip K. Dick’s 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Ridley Scott’s 1982 science fiction thriller, Blade Runner, introduced audiences to a dystopian future where synthetic humans, known as Replicants, are bio-engineered for use in off-world colonization. When these Replicants go rogue, special police units called Blade Runners hunt down and “retire” them. Despite its initial lukewarm critical and commercial reception, Blade Runner has become one of the most influential movies of the last 40 years, pioneering what became an entirely new genre: neo-noir cyberpunk. 35 years later, thanks to subsequent releases like the 1992 Director’s Cut and the definitive 2007 Final Cut, Scott’s film is now heralded as a groundbreaking visionary masterpiece and one of the most important motion pictures ever made. Now, another visionary filmmaker, the Oscar-nominated Denis Villeneuve, attempts to honor the original film while expanding its influence with a sequel, the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049. Directed from a screenplay written by Blade …

Based on the acclaimed comic book by Dave Gibbons and Mark Millar, 2015’s Kingsman: The Secret Service was a crass, tongue-in-cheek tribute to the spy films of the ’60s and ’70s. Co-written and directed by English filmmaker Matthew Vaughn (of Layer Cake, Stardust, Kick-Ass, X-Men: First Class), the stylish and subversive send-up became the filmmaker’s most commercially successful film to date. Enter the highly anticipated sequel, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, a movie so overblown and preposterous that it feels less like On Her Majesty’s Secret Service and more like the deranged lovechild of Austin Powers and Crank. This sequel picks up a year after unrefined street kid Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Taron Egerton) joined the Kingsman, England’s super-secret spy agency, and saved the world from Richmond Valentine’s neurological wave broadcast. Since then, Eggsy has taken his late mentor Harry Hart’s code name, Galahad, and is living with Crown Princess Tilde of Sweden (Hanna Alström). Things are going great for the suave super-spy …

Inspired by Richard Matheson, Ray Bradbury, H.P. Lovecraft, and EC Comics’ Tales from the Crypt and The Vault of Horror, Stephen King carved a path for himself as the world’s foremost writer of horror fiction throughout the ’70s and ’80s. By the time his novel It was published in 1986, many of King’s best-selling books had already been adapted into successful films, including Carrie, The Shining, Cujo, The Dead Zone, and Christine. With the ambitious It, however, King’s work shifted shape, much like the novel’s titular evil entity haunting a small town in Maine. Instead of writing about the one thing that scared you, like a rabid dog or a demonic car, this time he was writing about everything that did – the very nature of fear itself. Upon its release, King called the novel, “the summation of everything I have learned and done in my whole life to this point.” The book became an instant classic and the top-selling book …

The beloved sketch comedy group Good Neighbor was originally formed in 2007 by Kyle Mooney, Beck Bennett, Nick Rutherford, and Dave McCary. The comedians racked up millions of YouTube hits with their offbeat and uncomfortable sketch videos, including such notable standouts as “My Mom’s a MILF”, “Is My Roommate Gay?”, “420 Disaster,” and “Unbelievable Dinner,” based on Steven Spielberg’s Hook. In 2013, Mooney and Bennett joined Saturday Night Live as featured players along with McCary, who stayed behind the camera as a segment director. Now Mooney and McCary are transitioning to the big screen with the indie comedy Brigsby Bear, a feature-length narrative about friendship, family, and nostalgia that deftly blends humor and heart to create something that is both odd and oddly affectionate. Directed by McCary and co-written by Mooney and their childhood friend Kevin Costello, Brigsby Bear stars Mooney as James, a sensitive young adult living in an underground bunker with his over-protective parents, Ted and April Mitchum (Mark …

Written and directed by Luc Besson (of Léon: The Professional, La Femme Nikita, and Lucy), Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is based on the Valérian and Laureline graphic novel series by writer Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières. First published in 1967 in the French comics magazine, Pilote, the seminal science fiction series paved the way for Heavy Metal, and informed George Lucas’ Star Wars and Besson’s 1997 film, The Fifth Element, for which Mézières contributed concept art. The live-action adaptation, independently crowd-sourced and personally funded by Besson, is supposedly now the most expensive independent film ever made, but does it live up to its influential source material? Set in the year 2740, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets follows Major Valerian (Dane DeHaan, A Cure for Wellness) and Sergeant Laureline (Cara Delevingne, Suicide Squad), special operatives tasked with upholding the law throughout the human territories. Under assignment from the Minister of Defense (Herbie Hancock), the …