Post Archive

May 17, 2017

A rare film that we didn’t even know was going to exist at the start of the year, Claire Denis is back with a new drama starring Juliette Binoche, Gérard Depardieu, and Xavier Beauvois. Set to open Directors’ Fortnight today, Let the Sunshine In is adapted from Roland Barthes‘ A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments, which deconstructs the …

From the streets of New Jersey, here comes Patti Cake$. Directed by Geremy Jasper, his debut follows Patricia Dumbrowski (Danielle MacDonald), a woman from Bergen County, New Jersey seeking fame through hip-hop. Patti Cake$ premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. In our review, we praised the performance from newcomer MacDonald but was …

It may not win the Palme d’Or if the jury president has his way, but that doesn’t lessen our anticipation for Bong Joon-hoo‘s Snowpiercer follow-up Okja. Starring Ahn Seo-hyun, Tilda Swinton, Jake Gyllenhaal, Paul Dano, Steven Yeun, Lily Collins, Devon Bostick, Byun Hee-bong, and Shirley Henderson, the Netflix-produced and distributed feature tracks the struggle …

Cannes Film Festival has now kicked off (our review of the opening night film) and there’s still a wealth of highly-anticipated films left to premiere, three of which we have the first clips for tonight. First up, there’s the first look at Yorgos Lanthimos‘ The Lobster follow-up The Killing of a …

Sometimes when you reach your destination you discover you haven’t even started. The Tobolowsky Files is a podcast from the people who brought you the /Filmcast, featuring a series of stories about life, love, and Hollywood, as told by legendary character actor Stephen Tobolowsky. You can e-mail Stephen at stephentobolowsky(AT)gmail(DOT)com. You can …

After four films, including the brilliant Cannes 2014 title “Leviathan,” we are almost prepared for the crystalline perfection of Russian genius Andrey Zvyagintsev‘s style. The long takes that end in razor-fine, lacerating edits. The frames composed like sculptural studies in decay and dereliction. The rancorous exchanges acidic enough that a carelessly dropped word could burn through the floor to the apartment below. And we even expected his bitterness, his allegorically politicized critique of Russian society, its corruption and cruelty. Continue reading Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Purgatorial, Punishing, Pristine ‘Loveless’ [Cannes Review] at The Playlist.